Wellness

How To Overcome Rejection

 

Getting rejected is just a part of a life well lived, of a life where you go outside of your comfort zone. No one has ever succeeded in love or life without first facing rejection. We all experience it, and yet those times we feel the most alone and unwanted which is enough to make you never want to put yourself out there again. And yet you must, or you’ll never find the people and opportunity that wants everything you have to offer. Here are some tips to get you started:

Acknowledge your Emotions

Rejection hurts, no matter the source. It also brings about some uncomfortable emotions such as awkwardness, embarrassment and sadness. Others might see it as no big deal and tell you to get over it but the pain might linger, especially if you have a higher sensitivity to criticism. 

You are the one that can truly know how you are feeling at that particular moment. You are the only one in control of your emotion so the first step to overcoming rejection is by acknowledging your feelings. Telling yourself that you don’t care about getting hurt when you really do or that everything is actually fine when it isn’t denies you the opportunity to confront and manage this fear effectively. 

Use Rejection to your Advantage.

Sometimes, rejection is a harsh reality check. But if you approach it right, it could help nudge you in a direction that turns out to be perfect for your talents, personality and all the really great things that makes you who you are. 

It can actually provide opportunities for self-growth and discovery. It can make it easier to try what you want and lessen the pain if you fail. Try telling yourself that failure is just a first attempt in learning. It is also an opportunity for you to develop your skills and work on yourself. 

Say No to Your Inner Critic.

 If you’re more sensitive to rejection and spend a lot of time worrying about it, you might imagine a lot of worst-case scenarios. You might say things like “I talked too much”, “I’m boring” or “I knew I’d mess that up”. It is easy to fall into a pattern of self-criticism after experiencing rejection. 

Your inner critic is the voice that pipes up in your mind and tells you of how you are not attractive enough or how you were not smart enough and that’s why you got rejected.  

Positive thinking and constant encouragement or support of yourself will help shut out the voice and ensure to focus on what you still have in your life. 

Let it All Out to a Friend or Loved One.

Bottling the rejection and this situation up can make it feel and seem a lot worse than it needs to be. 

Talking it over with a friend, family member or partner can help release the pent up emotions and to start seeing the situation with clear and sober eyes. They are the best support system that will offer you encouragement when you try to achieve your goal and also offer you comfort if your efforts don’t succeed. Venting it all out allows you to start figuring out the appropriate solution to whatever has happened and how to move on from it. Spending time with people who care about you can reinforce your knowledge and help you practice exposing yourself to rejection scenarios that you are afraid of. 

Rejection can sting and make you doubt yourself. But fearing it may limit you and prevent you from experiencing much of what life has to offer. 

Pain usually fades with time, and this pain is no exception. In a year or even a few months, it may no longer matter very much as long as you are willing to let go.  

Please comment and share.
Xoxo.

17 thoughts on “How To Overcome Rejection

  1. Talking about rejection with a friend or family member is one of the biggest ways I get out my emotions; I used to take rejection pretty hard but now I view it as an opportunity to find the right place for my writing.
    Thanks so much for sharing this!

    Jaya| ninchronicles.com

  2. Yes, it's definitely good to have someone to talk to after a painful rejection, especially if that rejection touches on some core aspect of your being. One good, trusted friend can help put things in perspective. Otherwise, the imagination runs wild and that demonic inner critic takes over. I've been down that road and didn't like it! The worst thing is to fail so much that you stop putting yourself out there and taking risks. This is what I've struggled with for years. No, get up, dust yourself off, and get back at it better next time. Paul

  3. Yes, it's definitely good to have someone to talk to after a painful rejection, especially if that rejection touches on some core aspect of your being. One good, trusted friend can help put things in perspective. Otherwise, the imagination runs wild and that demonic inner critic takes over. I've been down that road and didn't like it! The worst thing is to fail so much that you stop putting yourself out there and taking risks. This is what I've struggled with for years. No, get up, dust yourself off, and get back at it better next time. Paul

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